Feeling as though one has been taken advantage of is a terrible sensation. In some situations California residents may put their faith and trust in others only to find out later that they were subjected to the wrongful acts of those they believed in. This type of untruthfulness may be considered fraud. The state and federal governments recognize the crime of fraud in many different contexts including but not limited to wire fraud, mail fraud, and insurance fraud.

At its most basic level, fraud involves deceit and financial gain. It generally involves at least two parties. One party may wish to obtain the money or property of the other, and the party who wishes to obtain such goods may deceive or lie to the other in order to get what they want.

Allegations of fraud can happen in many different contexts. In some situations, fraud may occur between business partners or associates, or between fiduciaries and those who give them authority. Fraud may become an issue in the context of negotiations or entering a contract. In fact, fraud can be a criminal or civil legal issue.

However, when fraud is claimed in the criminal justice system, the person facing the charges may be confronted with a difficult and overwhelming situation. Fraud is considered a white collar crime but like violent crimes fraud too can be punished with significant penalties. An individual who is convicted of fraud may be subjected to significant fines and even incarceration.

Fraud is a crime because honest and truthful interactions are necessary for individuals to make good decisions about how to act. When fraud is alleged, building a defense plan can be an integral step in protecting the future of the accused. This post is not offered as legal advice and readers can discuss their legal needs with their trusted criminal defense attorneys.